Faculty

Barry Eichengreen
George C. Pardee and Helen N. Pardee Professor of Economics, Professor of Political Science

Barry Eichengreen is the George C. Pardee and Helen N. Pardee Professor of Economics and Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1987. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Massachusetts) and Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (London, England). In 1997-98 he was Senior Policy Advisor at the International Monetary Fund. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (class of 1997). Professor Eichengreen is the convener of the Bellagio Group of academics and economic officials and chair of the Academic Advisory Committee of the  IMF policy.

Benjamin Faber
Assistant Professor

Ben Faber is assistant professor in the Economics Department at the University of California Berkeley. His research is at the intersection of international trade and economic development, broadly looking at how falling barriers to flows of trade, investment and ideas affect economic outcomes and policy choices in developing countries. Before joining UC Berkeley in 2013, he received his PhD from the London School of Economics after visiting MIT and UCLA as part of his doctoral studies.

Cecile Gaubert
Assistant Professor

Cecile Gaubert is assistant professor in the Economics Department at the University of California Berkeley. Her primary fields of research are international trade and economic geography.  In her dissertation she examined the effect of policies on the location of firms across cities. Cecile received her PhD from the Princeton University.

Yuriy Gorodnichenko
Associate Professor

Yuriy Gorodnichenko is associate professor in the Economics department at the University of California, Berkeley. He is a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Massachusetts); and Research Fellow at the Institute of the Study of Labor (IZA). Professor Gorodnichenko is Associate Editor of the Journal of the European Economic Association, and Visiting Scholar at the San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank. His areas of research interest include monetary economics; aggregate implications of informal frictions; business cycles; development, productivity and income differences; and, inequality.

Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas
Clausen Center Director and Professor

Pierre Olivier Gourinchas is professor in the Economics department and Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, and faculty director of the Clausen Center for International Business and Policy. He is a member of the French Council of Economic Advisors, and Editor-in-Chief of the IMF Economic Review, Research Fellow at the Center for Economic Policy Research, and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Massachusetts). His main research interests are in international macroeconomics and finance. His recent research focuses on the importance of the valuation channel for the dynamics of external adjustment and the determination of exchange rates; the determinants of capital flows to and from developing countries; on international portfolios; global imbalances; international price discrimination; and the global financial crisis.

Amir Kermani
Assistant Professor

Amir Kermani holds joint positions as assistant professor at the Haas School of Business and Department of Economics at the University of California Berkeley. His research interests include monetary policy, macroeconomics and housing, market securitization and political economy. Before joining UC Berkeley in 2013, he received his PhD from MIT.

Martin Lettau
Kruttschnitt Family Chair in Financial Institutions

Martin Lettau is the Kruttschnitt Family Chair in Financial Institutions at the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Massachusetts); and a Research Fellow at the Center for Economic Policy and Research (London, England). His empirical work lies at the intersection of asset pricing and macroeconomics, and includes investigations of stock market volatility, macroeconomic risk and the equity premium, currency returns and risk premia, stocks and crashes, and the nexus between consumption, wealth and expected returns.

Ross Levine
Willis H. Booth Chair in Banking and Finance

Ross Levine is the Willis H. Booth Chair in Banking and Finance at the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. He is Senior Fellow at the Milken Institute, Member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Massachusetts); Professor Levine’s work focuses on financial regulation and economic growth, income inequality, and poverty; financial crises; the political economy of financial regulation; international capital flows; and the returns to entrepreneurship and the qualities of entrepreneurs.

Adair Morse
Associate Professor

Adair Morse is associate professor of finance at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley. She is a Faculty Research Fellow, National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Massachusetts). Her research covers the areas of household finance, entrepreneurship, corruption and governance, and asset management. Recent work has been instrumental in re-directing the debate on tax reform in Greece. Her work on fraud helped to shape the bounty provisions in the Dodd Frank law of financial reform; and, her work on trickle down consumption has contributed to the debate on the financial crisis and income inequality.

Emi Nakamura
Chancellor's Professor of Economics

Emi Nakamura holds a PhD from Harvard University and an A.B. from Princeton University. She taught at the Columbia economics department and business school before joining the Berkeley economics department in 2018. Her research focuses on monetary and fiscal policy, business cycles and macroeconomic measurement. She is a co-editor of the American Economic Review, and Program Director for the Monetary Economics program of the National Bureau of Economic Research. She is on the CBO’s Panel of Economic Advisers and the AEA Committee on National Statistics. She has been a visiting professor at the University of Chicago, the MIT Economics Department, and numerous central banks. She is a recipient of the NSF Career Grant, the Sloan Research Fellowship, and the Elaine Bennett Research Prize.

Maurice Obstfeld
Class of 1958 Professor of Economics

Maurice Obstfeld is the Class of 1958 Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley.  Professor Obstfeld serves as honorary advisor to the Bank of Japan's Institute of Monetary and Economic Studies.  He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also Research Fellow at the Center for Economic Policy and Research (London, England), a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Massachusetts), and an International Research Fellow at the Kiel Institute of World Economics. Professor Obstfeld has published extensively in international economics, macroeconomics and monetary economics. Most recently his work has focused on dynamic open-economy models with nominal rigidities, exchange rates and international financial crises, global capital-market integration in a historical perspective, and monetary policy in open economies.

Andres Rodriguez-Clare
Professor

Andres Rodriguez-Clare, is a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, Director of the Trade Research Programme at the International Growth Centre, Visiting Scholar at the San Francisco Federal Reserve, and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Massachusetts). His areas of research focus on international trade, development economics and macroeconomics. He held the position of Chairman of the Council of Presidential Advisors in Costa Rica during 1998-2002, and has written policy work in the areas of growth, innovation and technology adoption in Latin America and the Caribbean. His most recent research has focused on the effects of trade and globalization in models with monopolistic competition, looking at gains from trade, and the effects of specialization and its welfare consequences.  

Andrew Rose
Bernard T. Rocca, Jr. Chair in International Business & Trade

Andrew Rose is the Bernard T. Rocca, Jr. Chair in International Business & Trade and serves as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the Haas School of Business. He is also a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (based in Cambridge, MA), and a Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (based in London, England). His research addresses issues in international trade, finance, and macroeconomics. He interested in the theory and practice of economic policy, and most of his work is applied and driven by real world international phenomena. He has worked on five continents and at a number of international economic agencies and national agencies in five continents.

Jón Steinsson
Chancellor's Professor of Economics

Jon Steinsson joined the Berkeley in 2018 as Chancellor's Professor of Economics. He received a bachelor‘s degree in economics from Princeton University in 2000 and a Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2007. Jon taught at Columbia University from 2008 to 2018 before moving to Berkeley. He is Co-Director for the Monetary Economics program of the National Bureau of Economic Research. His main area of research is empirical macroeconomics. His work has focused on characterizing price rigidity and its macroeconomic consequences, identifying the effects of monetary and fiscal policies, and understanding the effects of forward guidance on the economy among other things. He grew up in Iceland and participates actively in the political and economic discourse in that country.

Annette Vissing-Jorgensen
Arno A. Rayner Chair in Finance and Management

Annette Vissing-Jorgensen holds the Arno A. Rayner Chair in Finance and Management at the Haas School of Business and is the chair for the finance group. Her research focuses on empirical asset pricing, monetary policy, household finance and entrepreneurship. Her research thus spans both asset pricing and corporate finance. She is a research associate in the NBER's Asset Pricing program, Monetary Economics program, and Economic Fluctuations and Growth program and is a research fellow in the CEPR's Financial Economics program. She is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Finance and (as of 2014) a director of both the American Finance Association and the European Finance Association.

Gabriel Zucman
Assistant Professor

Gabriel Zucman is assistant professor in the Economics Department at the University of California Berkeley. His research focuses on economic inequality and tax heavens. He earned his PhD from the Paris School of Economics in 2013 receiving the French Economic Association's award for best PhD dissertation in 2014. He worked as assistant professor of economics at the London School of Economics prior to joining Berkeley. Since 2015, he has worked as Co-Director of the World Wealth and Income Database (WID), a database aiming at the provision of access to extensive data series on the world distribution of income and wealth.

Visiting Faculty

Alonso Alfaro-UreñaSpring 2019
Researcher, Central Bank of Costa Rica and Assistant professor, School of Economics, University of Costa Rica

Alonso's research spans the areas of international trade, growth, development and monetary economics. he received his PhD from Penn Sate University.

Nick TsivanidisFall 2018
International Economics Fellow at Dartmouth College

Nick Tsivanidis is an applied economist with interests across Urban and Regional Economics, Development Economics, and Applied Macroeconomics. His research centers on connecting theory with empirics that combine new sources of granular data with natural experiments to learn about the process of urbanization in developing countries.

Chris EdmondFall 2018
Professor of Economics, University of Melbourne

Chris Efmond's main research interests are in macroeconomics, international economics, and information economics. He currently holds a position at the University of Melbourne. Prior to that, he was an Assistant Professor of Economics at the Stern School of Business, New York University. Chris received his PhD in economics from UCLA in 2004.

Galina HaleFall 2015 - Fall 2018
Research Advisor Risk Modeling Research

Galina Hale has worked at the San Francisco Fed since 2006. She obtained a PhD in Economics from UC Berkeley in 2002 and was an assistant professor in the Economics department of Yale University betwen 2002 and 2006. Her research focuses on understanding international capital flows and banking.  

Martin BerajaSpring 2018
Assistant professor

Martin Beraja is an assistant professor at MIT. He holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Chicago. His fields of interest include monetary policy, business cycles, and disinflation.

Wenxin DuSpring 2018
Principal Economist

Dixien Wu is a Principal Economist at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. She holds a PhD in Economics from Harvard University. Her main research interests are in international finance, asset pricing and banking.

Oleg ItskhokiFall 2015 - Spring 2018
Assistant Professor

He is a Faculty Research Fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, Massachusetts); and Research Affiliate at the Centre for Economic Policy Research. His areas of interest include macroeconomics and international economics, studying the macroeconomic consequences of frictions in the labor and financial markets, and in price setting mechanisms

Thomas MertensFall 2015 - Spring 2018
Senior Economist Financial Research

Thomas Mertens is a senior economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. He holds a PhD in Economics from Harvard University. He was an assistant professor in finance at NYU Stern School of Business between 2009 and 2015. 

Felix TintelnotSpring 2018
Assistant professor

Felix Tintelnot is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago. He holds a PhD from  Pennsylvania State University. His area of research is international trade.

Ariel WeinbergerSpring 2018
Assistant professor

Ariel Weinberger is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Oklahoma. He holds a PhD from UC Davis. His  research is in trade and macro, with specialization in settings with firm heterogeneity and variable market power. I have applied these settings to study allocative efficiency and factor shares.

Marianna KudlyakSpring 2016 - Fall 2017
Senior Economist, Macroeconomic Research

Marianna Kudlyak is macroeconomist with research interests in labor markets and household finance. She received a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Rochester. Prior to joining the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, she served as an Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. She has also served as a visiting scholar at, UC Berkeley, the University of Texas, Austin, and CIREQ, Montreal.

Matteo MaggioriSpring 2016 - Fall 2017
Assistant Professor

Matteo Maggiori is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Harvard University. His research focuses on finance and international macroeconomics.  His research topics have included the analysis of exchange rate dynamics, the international financial system, bubbles, and very long-run discount rates.  He is a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a research affiliate at the Center for Economic Policy Research.

Philippe MartinSpring 2012 - Fall 2017
Professor

Philippe Martin is professor at the department of economics at Sciences Po (Paris) since 2009. He is also a Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research CEPR (London) and a ember of the Council of Economic Advisers of the Prime Minister since September 2012.  He was previously assistant professor at the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and professor at the University of Paris 1 Panthéon - Sorbonne (Paris School of Economics) and a co-managing editor of Economic policy. He was awarded the award of best young (under 40) young French economist in 2002.  His fields of research are international macroeconomics and finance and international trade. His research was published among others in the American Economic Review, the Review of Economic Studies, the Quarterly journal of Economics and the Journal of International Economics. He also co-authored a book “Economic geography and public policy” published by Princeton University Press (2003) and of a book on “the economics of clusters” at Oxford University Press (2011). A graduate from Sciences Po, he holds a Ph.D. in economics from Georgetown University.

Alfonzo IrarrazabalFall 2016 - Spring 2017
Professor of Economics

Alfonzo Irrarrazabal, MSc, MA, PhD, is a Professor or Economics at BI Norwegian School of Economics.  His primary research interests are: macroeconomics, asset pricing, corporate finance, and commodities.  His work has been published in The Review of Economics and Statistics, the Journal of Political Economy, and the Journal of International Economics, among others.   Prior to joining BI Norwegian Business School, he served as a visiting scholar ar the University of Chicago Booth, an Assistant Professor at the University of Oslo, and as a Senior Economist at Norges Bank.

Daniel SturmSpring 2017
Professor of Economics

Daniel Sturm, M.Sc. (LSE), Ph.D. (LSE), is a Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at the London School of Economics and also a Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research. Prior to joining the LSE in 2006 he was an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Munich. His research interests are primarily in the areas of Economic Geography and Political Economy. In particular he works on the empirical implications of economic geography models and also on the empirical effects of electoral accountability on policy choices. His work has been published in a number of academic journals, including the American Economic Review, Econometrica, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Review of Economic Studies and Review of Economics and Statitics.

Lorenzo CaliendoSpring 2016
Professor of Economics

Professor Caliendo’s research is focused on understanding and quantifying the economic effects of international trade and migration. His work follows three main strands. The first strand focuses on the determinants of the trade and welfare effects of commercial and migration policy. Of particular interest to him are the propagation effects, via input-output linkages, across spatially distinct labor markets. The second examines how a firm’s growth and how foreign trade competition affect a firm’s organizational structure, the wage structure inside a firm, and a firm’s productivity. The third strand deals with understanding the macroeconomics effects of international trade and growth.

Fernando DuarteSpring 2016
Economist

Fernando Duarte is an Economist in the Capital Markets Function at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, with main research interests ininflation, asset pricing, and the connections between macroeconomics and finance. Fernando obtained his Ph.D. in Economics from MIT in 2011.

Olivier JeanneSpring 2016
Senior Fellow

Olivier Jeanne joined the Peterson Institute for International Economics as a senior fellow in 2008. He is a professor of economics at the Johns Hopkins University and has taught at UC Berkeley (1997) and at Princeton University (2005–06). From 1998 to 2008 he held various positions in the Research Department of the International Monetary Fund. His research spans an array of applied and theoretical topics in international and domestic macroeconomics, including capital flows, exchange-rate regimes and currency crises, sovereign debt and defaults, international reserves, and monetary policy.

Peter MorrowFall 2015 - Spring 2016
Associate Professor

Peter Morrow received a PhD in Economics from the Universty of Michigan in 2007 and has beenat the University of Toronto since then. His research focuses on international trade. 

Thomas PhilipponSpring 2016
Professor of Finance

Thomas Philippon is Professor of Finance at New York University - Stern School of Business.

Manuel AmadorFall 2015
Monetary Advisor

Manuel Amador joined the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis as a monetary advisor in 2013. He has also been an assistant professor of economics in the Department of Economics at Stanford University, at Harvard University and at Stanford Graduate School of Business. He received his B.S. in economics from Pontificia Universidad Catolica Madre y Maestra, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; his P.I.M.A. degree from Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; and his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Vladimir AsriyanFall 2015
Researcher

Vladimir Asriyan was born in Yerevan, Armenia, and moved to the United States in 2001, where he completed my B.A. in Economics and Mathematics at the University of California - San Diego and a Ph.D. in Economics at the University of California - Berkeley. He moved to Barcelona, Spain in September 2014 to begin a position as a Researcher at Centre de Recerca en Economia Internacional (CREi). He is also an Adjunct Professor in the Economics Department at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra and an Affiliated Professor at the Barcelona Graduate School of Economics. 

Jonathan EatonFall 2015
Professor of Economics and Director, Rhodes Center for International Economics and Finance

Jonathan Eaton researches buyers and sellers in the growing field of global commerce networks. He is also working on the diffusion of technology among countries of the world.

Helene ReyFall 2015
Professor

Hélène Rey is Professor of Economics at London Business School.  Until 2007, she was at Princeton University, as Professor of Economics and International Affairs in the Economics Department and the Woodrow Wilson School. Her research focuses on the determinants and consequences of external trade and financial imbalances, the theory of financial crises and the organization of the international monetary system. She demonstrated in particular that countries gross external asset positions help predict current account adjustments and the exchange rate.  In 2005 she was awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship. She received the 2006 Bernácer Prize (best European economist working in macroeconomics and finance under the age of 40). In 2012 she received the inaugural Birgit Grodal Award of the European Economic Association honoring a European-based female economist who has made a significant contribution to the Economics profession. In 2013 she received the Yrjö Jahnsson Award (European economist under 45 years old who has made a contribution in theoretical and applied research that is significant to economics in Europe), shared with Thomas Piketty. Professor Rey is a Fellow of the British Academy, of the Econometrics Society and of the European Economic Association. She is on the board of the Review of Economic Studies and  associate editor of the AEJ: Macroeconomics Journal. She is a CEPR Research Fellow and an NBER Research Associate.  She is on the Board of the Autorité de Contrôle Prudentiel, a member of the Commission Economique de la Nation and of the Bellagio Group on the international economy. She was a member of the Conseil d’Analyse Economique until 2012. She writes a regular column for the French newspaper Les Echos. Hélène Rey received her undergraduate degree from ENSAE, a Master in Engineering Economic Systems from Stanford University and her PhDs from the London School of Economics and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales.

Ina SimonovskaFall 2015
Associate Professor

Professor Simonovska’s research interests focus on understanding the sources of welfare gains from international integration. On the one hand, she develops theoretical and empirical models that evaluate the different channels through which trade liberalization in goods and services lowers consumer good prices and raises consumer wellbeing. On other hand, she formalizes and tests hypotheses about determinants of cross-border investment flows, which ultimately lead to the accumulation of capital and the macroeconomic development of a nation.

Shahin ValléeFall 2015
Fellow at Large

Shahin Vallée has been affiliated with Bruegel since October 2010. In June 2012 he was appointed Economic Advisor to the President of the European Council, Herman Van Rompuy where he worked in particular on questions pertaining to the architecture of the euro area and the consequences of the economic and financial crisis. He has subsequently been the Economic Advisor to the French Economy Minister from September 2014 to May 2015 when he joined Soros Fund Management as a Senior Economist.

Gabriel ZucmanSpring 2015
Assistant Professor

Gabriel Zucman is assistant professor in the Economics Department at the University of California Berkeley. His research focuses on economic inequality and tax heavens.  He earned his PhD from the Paris School of Economics in 2013 receiving the French Economic Association's award for best PhD dissertation in 2014. He worked as assistant professor of economics at the London School of Economics prior to joining Berkeley. Since 2015, he has worked as Co-Director of the World Wealth and Income Database (WID), a database aiming at the provision of access to extensive data series on the world distribution of income and wealth.

David AtkinSpring 2014
Assistant Professor

David Atkin is an assistant professor at Yale University. He holds a PhD in Economics from Princeton University, as well as a MSc Economics from the London School of Economics. His fields of interest are International Trade and Development Economics. His work uses the tools common in development to investigate the impacts of trade on the poor in the developing world.

Emmanuel FarhiFall 2013
Assistant Professor

Emmanuel Farhi is a Professor of Economics at Harvard University. His research focuses on macroeconomics, finance, international economics, and public finance. He is a member of the French Economic Analysis Council to the French Prime Minister, a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, the Center for Economic Policy Research, the International Growth Centre, as well as a fellow of the Toulouse School of Economics. He is also an associate editor of the American Economic Review.

Graduate Fellows

Martin Caruso Bloeck2019-20

Martin Caruso Bloeck is a first year PhD Student at UC Berkeley. Prior to joining Berkeley, he worked as an External Consultant for the Inter-American Development Bank and the Argentine Treasury. He is interested in international finance with an emphasis on emerging markets.

Oliver Kim2019-20

Oliver Kim is a PhD student in the Economics Department. Before coming to Berkeley, he worked as a research assistant at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. He is interested in research at the intersection of development and international trade.

Jianlin Wang2018-19

Jianlin Wang is a second year PhD student in Economics at UC Berkeley. He is interested in international economics, macroeconomics, and their interactions with the financial sector. The topics he is currently working on include the expectation effects of fiscal shocks, linkages between globalization and US monetary policy, exchange-rate pass-through, and operational risk of US banking sector. Before joining Berkeley, he worked as a Research Assistant at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston while attending the Advanced Study Program at MIT.

Dennis Egger2017-18

Dennis Egger is a rising second year PhD student in Economics at UC Berkeley. His research focuses on the economics of development and trade. He is particularly interested in the spatial aspects of development such as the spillover effects of local interventions, migration and the process of urbanization in developing countries. Through his work, he hopes to provide an empirical basis for improving the efficacy of development policy in a spatially inter-dependent socioeconomic context.

Preston Mui2016-17

Preston Mui is a graduate student in the Economics Department at UC-Berkeley. He was previously a research assistant at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. He is interested in macroeconomics and labor economics, with a focus on business cycles, wage setting, and unemployment.

Nick Sander2016-17

Nick Sander is a 5th year graduate student in the economics department. He was previously a Senior Analyst at the Reserve Bank of New Zealand. His research interests are in macroeconomics and international economics in particular the interactions between the financial sector and the wider economy. He currently is working on three projects: understanding the effects of capital inflows have on business cycles in the economy of the country receiving the inflows, understanding the effects of firm-to-firm lending on the transmission of risks in production networks and on the estimating the effect of monetary policy shocks when central banks are known to posses information about future economic outcomes.

Staff

Maria Carkovic
Executive Director

Joseph Mendoza
Clausen Center Administrator