Evidence-based Economic Policy in Pakistan, March 8, 2019, noon

Evidence-based Economic Policy in Pakistan, March 8, 2019, noon

The Institute for South Asia Studies is hosting a lecture, On “Evidence-based Economic Policy” in Pakistan on Friday, March 8, 2019, by Atif Mian, Professor, Economics, Public Policy and Finance (Princeton University) and Co-Founder & Board Member, Center for Economic Research in Pakistan (CERP); Asim I. Khwaja, Professor, International Finance and Development (Harvard University) and Co-Founder & Board Member, Center for Economic Research in Pakistan (CERP); Maroof A. Syed, President & CEO, Center for Economic Research in Pakistan (CERP) and Director of Pakistan Strategy & Development, Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD-Harvard); Saad Gulzaar, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Stanford University. The event will be moderated by Munis Faruqui, Chair, Institute for South Asia Studies, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Studies. The Clausen Center is co-sponsoring this event.

February 11, 2019: Taming Japan’s Deflation  | 12-1:30 p.m. | Berkeley Haas , N340

February 11, 2019: Taming Japan’s Deflation | 12-1:30 p.m. | Berkeley Haas , N340

Around the world, governments have delegated political independence to central banks that wield tremendous power based on the belief that independence would allow these institutions to keep inflation in check. From the mid-1990s, Japan’s economy charted a unique trajectory: it fell into deflation and never fully emerged from it for nearly the next twenty years. Only with the election of Prime Minister Shinzō Abe at the end of 2012 and his appointment in early 2013 of new leadership at Japan’s central bank, the Bank of Japan (BOJ), did Japan finally launch a policy course capable of pulling Japan fully out of deflation. This presentation explains the shift in BOJ policy and factors behind it.

 Gene Park, Associate Professor, Loyola Marymount University

 James A. Wilcox, Professor, Haas School of Business

 Steven Vogel, Professor, Political Science, UC Berkeley

 Register online

Feb. 14, 2019: The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics, and the Future of Work

Feb. 14, 2019: The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics, and the Future of Work

Richard Baldwin will give the Joan and Egon von Kaschnitz Lecture this Spring.

While globalization and robotics, “globotics”, will eventually make a better world, they are today creating competition for service-sector jobs that is coming faster than most believe and in ways that will seem incredibly unfair. If the displaced office workers join with the displaced factory workers, the result could be a disruptive upheaval. Richard Baldwin argues that workers need to prepare for the the future of work in new ways, and governments regulate the pace and unfairness of the competition from globots. Richard Baldwin is a Professor of International Economics at the Graduate Institute in Geneva, and Founder and Editor of the economic policy portal, VoxEU.org.

The Lecture will take place on February 14 at 3 PM in Spieker Forum,
6th Floor Chou Hall.

Coping with Global Backlash: National Economic Strategies and Business-Government Relations

Coping with Global Backlash: National Economic Strategies and Business-Government Relations

This conference will focus on three major themes in the global economy: the global backlash against the liberal trade order, national industrial strategies in key states, and the effect of technological change on the global economic order. Over two days, participants will examine empirical trends within these three areas and their likely impacts on global trade. The conference will close with a forum of participants from leading multinational corporations on business-government relations in this new global context.  The participants in the conference will include prominent academics and members of the business community both from the United States and abroad.

            The first day of the conference will focus on globalization, anti-globalization movements, and the strategies of multinational corporations in this volatile and changing global economy. With the rise of protectionism and nationalist movements in the United States, Britain, and many other developing countries, there has been increasing doubts about the durability of the liberal trading order that has prevailed since the end of World War II, as well as about its success at ensuring free trade and economic gains for all. Paralleling this movement has been a democratic recession, whereby authoritarianism is once again rearing its ugly head. The rising power, in military, political, and economic terms, of China raises important questions about China’s attitudes and intentions towards the current Western-dominated global political and economic system. Participants will analyze the important drivers in the global backlash against the liberal world order and the democratic recession and discuss what impact this may have on multinational corporations and the larger global order.

            The second day of the conference will focus on data competition, industrial policy, and business-government relations. Technological change and the rise of Big Data presents a new challenge to countries on how to order and regulate technology and data transfer both within and between countries. Participants will analyze trends in data competition and national technology and industrial strategies and discussing the impacts on multinational corporations and business-government relations.

Type

Conferences

Location

Doe Library

Date & Time

Oct 18-19, 2018

Website

https://events.berkeley.edu/index.php/calendar/sn/ieas.html?event_ID=118488

Nobel Laureate Jean Tirole Lecture

Nobel Laureate Jean Tirole Lecture

Jean Tirole, winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics will give the Joan and Egon von Kaschnitz Lecture this Spring. The public Lecture will be based on Professor Tirole’s book “Economics for the Common Good”
The lecture is sponsored by the Clausen Center and the Gilbert Center.

Type

Conferences

Location

Spieker Forum in Chou Hall, Berkeley-Haas

Date & Time

Apr 30, 2018

Website

none

Cost Of Democracy: Political Finance In India

Cost Of Democracy: Political Finance In India

A talk by political economist, Dr. Milan Vaishnav on his new book When Crime Pays: Money and Muscle in Indian Politics, the first thorough study of the co-existence of crime and democratic processes in Indian politics.

In India, the world’s largest democracy, the symbiotic relationship between crime and politics raises complex questions. For instance, how can free and fair democratic processes exist alongside rampant criminality? Why do political parties recruit candidates with reputations for wrongdoing? Why are one-third of state and national legislators elected—and often re-elected—in spite of criminal charges pending against them? In this eye-opening study, political scientist Milan Vaishnav mines a rich array of sources, including fieldwork on political campaigns and interviews with candidates, party workers, and voters, large surveys, and an original database on politicians’ backgrounds to offer the first comprehensive study of an issue that has implications for the study of democracy both within and beyond India’s borders. More on the book 

Milan Vaishnav is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, D.C. His primary research focus is the political economy of India. He was previously a fellow at the Center for Global Development and has taught at Columbia, George Washington, and Georgetown Universities. He received a Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University. Read more about Dr. Vaishnav 

Type

Conferences

Location

Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

Date & Time

Apr 17, 2018

Website

https://iis.berkeley.edu/events/cost-of-democracy-political-finance-in-india